ANALYZING ZOMATO BANGALORE RESTAURANTS DATA WITH TABLEAU

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Title of the project: Analyzing Zomato Data to find the best restaurants in Bangalore (India)using Tableau
Vertical industry: Food & Beverage
Business process: Marketing

 

 

 

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Executive Summary:

 

Data Visualization is an inevitable aspect of business analytics. As more and more sources of data are getting discovered, business managers at all levels embrace data visualization software, that allows them to analyze trends visually and take quick decisions. Currently, the most popular tools for visualizations/data discovery are QlikView and Tableau.

This tutorial is designed for all those readers who want to create, read, write, and modify Business Intelligence Reports using Tableau. This tutorial aids to create workbooks for data sources and publish them, and designed for people who want to see, interact with, and share views - in Tableau Desktop.

Tableau is a Business Intelligence tool for visually analyzing the data. Users can create and distribute an interactive and shareable dashboard, which depicts the trends, variations, and density of the data in the form of graphs and charts. Tableau can connect to files, relational, and Big Data sources to acquire and process data. The software allows data blending and real-time collaboration, which makes it unique. It is used by businesses, academic researchers, and many government organizations for visual data analysis. To use Tableau, we don’t need any programming knowledge or coding skills. Perhaps, all we need is data to analyze our business and Tableau Desktop to create reports. Using Tableau Desktop, we can create visually rich and meaningful reports. These Tableau reports tell us the story about our organization or business, perhaps the data we provide to it. It has a simple drag and drops features to design reports.

In this tutorial, we will take Zomato Bangalore Data and analyze it to find some interesting facts by looking into the visualization. Visualizations are among the most effective ways to analyze data from any business process. Visualizations are more fun to look at than the boring excel sheets and easier to understand as well.

This Tutorial will give us a brief idea on the different aspects of Tableau as what a dashboard and a storyboard are and what is the difference between the two. It will also guide us through worksheets, dashboard, and storyboard creation.

In the dashboard, we will analyze the data related to Café Coffee Day (a famous café and snack chain in India). We will try to address some business pain points of CCD and provide the management with Solutions to those problems.

In the Storyboard, we will analyze the same Zomato data to provide Khana Khazana Café (North Indian Café Chain) some vital information about starting their business in Bangalore.

 

Pre-Requisites: Before proceeding with this tutorial, we should have a basic understanding of Computer Programming terminologies and Data analysis. We should also have some knowledge of various types of graphs and charts. Familiarity with SQL will be an added advantage.

Software Requirements: We should have installed Tableau Desktop in our system

 

Background:

Brief Background of Zomato: Zomato is an Indian restaurant aggregator and food delivery startup founded in 2008. It was started by Deepinder Goyal and Pankaj Chaddah. It provides information, menus, and user-reviews of restaurants, and has food delivery options from partner restaurants in select cities.

Being a foodie from India, I was always fascinated by the food culture of India. So, the data set that I choose is "Zomato Bangalore Restaurants." Bengaluru is sometimes referred to as the "Silicon Valley of India" (or "IT capital of India"). With a population of 8,443,675 in the city and 10,456,000 in the urban agglomeration, Bangalore is a megacity, and the third-most-populous city in India and the 18th-most-populous city in the world. Most of the people here are dependent mainly on the restaurant food as they don’t have time to cook for themselves. Bangalore has more than 12000 restaurants. With such a high number of restaurants. This industry hasn't been saturated yet. And new restaurants are opening every day. However, it has become difficult for them to compete with already established restaurants. With such an overwhelming demand for restaurants, it has therefore become important to study the demography of a location and do data analyses to come up with answers for the innumerable questions that can be asked. Some of the questions are as follows.

  • What are the most popular chain restaurants are there in Bangalore and with what kind of facilities?
  • Which is the most popular cuisine with the maximum number of restaurants in Bangalore?
  • Best Restaurants in the Area.

 

Learning Objective:

  • To become familiar with TABLEAU (visualization tool) for data analytics.
  • To learn multiple ways of representing data.
  • To learn to draw inferences, hypotheses, and form questions based on visualizations.
  • To become familiar at using the TABLEAU Dashboard and Storyboard to represent the analyses graphically.

 

Data Description:

The data is accurate to that available on the Zomato website until 15 March 2019. The data was scraped from Zomato in two phases.

Phase I,

In Phase, I of extraction only the URL, name, and address of the restaurant were extracted which were visible on the front page. The URLs for each of the restaurants on the Zomato were recorded in the CSV file so that later the data can be extracted individually for each restaurant. This made the extraction process easier.

Phase II,

In Phase II the recorded data for each restaurant and each category was read and data for each restaurant was scraped individually. 15 variables were scraped in this phase. For each of the neighborhood and each category their online_order, book_table, rate, votes, phone, location, rest_type, dish_liked, cuisines, approx_cost(for two people), reviews_list, menu_item was extracted.

The data set available to be downloaded from Kaggle.

Link:

https://www.kaggle.com/himanshupoddar/zomato-bangalore-restaurants

The data contains 51717 rows and 17 columns

Columns

Description

URL

 

contains the URL of the restaurant in the zomato website


address

 

contains the address of the restaurant in Bengaluru

 

Name

 

contains the name of the restaurant

 

Online_order

 

whether online ordering is available in the restaurant or not

 

book_table

 

table book option available or not

 

Rate

 

contains the overall rating of the restaurant out of 5

 

Votes

 

contains the total number of rating for the restaurant as of the above-mentioned date

Phone

 

contains the phone number of the restaurant

 

Location

 

contains the neighborhood in which the restaurant is located

 

rest_type

 

restaurant type

 

dish_liked

dishes people liked in the restaurant

 

Cuisines

 

food styles

 

Approx_cost (for two people)

contains the approximate cost for a meal for two people

 

reviews_list

 

list of tuples containing reviews for the restaurant, each tuple consists of two values, rating and review by the customer

 

menu_item

 

contains a list of menus available in the restaurant

 

listed_in(type)

type of meal

 

listed_in(city)

 

contains the neighborhood in which the restaurant is listed

 

Data Preparation:

As the data is from Kaggle it was not a clean Data.  Initially, Tableau wasn’t showing the correct field names. What appears to be the field names were mostly showing up as data in the first row (although several fields display null to indicate that the contents are invalid based on the data type of the field).

The reason that Tableau was having problems with the fields becomes clearer when I looked at the worksheet back in Excel. I found extra rows above the data and a blank column within the data

I used both Excel and Tableau for Data preparation and Cleaning.

I followed the below-mentioned steps in Excel:

  • Removed URL, phone, and reviews list column from the data set as these columns were not contributing much to the analyses that we are going to do.
  • In excel tried to filter out rows that contained data that are not aligned with the columns.

I followed the below-mentioned steps in Tableau:

  • As the final filtering step, I removed the dirty data when and where it was required in the Tableau Worksheets.
  • Created a Calculated Field called “No. of Restaurants” to calculate the Total Number of Restaurants available in the city of Bengaluru.

 

Deliverable 1- Dashboard:

Before starting with the tutorial on the Dashboard, I would like to discuss “what is a dashboard” and “why is it used”.

What is a Dashboard?

A dashboard is a type of graphical user interface that often provides at-a-glance views of key performance indicators relevant to an objective or business process. A good business dashboard informs with a glance. In Tableau the Dashboard is a consolidated display of many worksheets and related information in a single place. Our dashboard will look something like this. We will learn in detail about the creation of this dashboard in the procedure.

Link to our Dashboard:

https://public.tableau.com/profile/sharmistha.ganguly.ghosh#!/vizhome/Ghosh_SharmisthaGanguly_5_Dashboard/Dashboard_Tutorial?publish=yes

Why is it used?

By combining varying visualizations into a dashboard, we can analyze different aspects of the data in the context of each other. This is a much more intuitive experience than viewing the visualizations individually. The dashboard is mainly used for Diagnostic analysis. A good dashboard can make risk/ opportunities identifiable in less than 30 seconds.

Scenario:

Café Coffee Day is an Indian café chain. It is a subsidiary of Coffee Day Enterprises Limited. It is headquartered in Bangalore, India. The first CCD outlet was set up on July 11, 1996, at Brigade Road, Bangalore, Karnataka. It rapidly expanded to other cities in India, with more than 1000 cafés open across the nation by 2011.  CCD recently is losing some business to some of the emerging chain restaurants in Bangalore. VP of Sales of CCD requested we (Regional Sales Manager) to provide him with a report/dashboard showing the key performance indicators of CCD and the other competitors. With this report, he expects to analyze the current business scenario of CCD. He expects to have an insight into the Rating distribution, Pricing strategy, and facilities available in the restaurants. He would like to have a quick look into the dashboard so the dashboard should not contain any complicated calculation or visual. He would also like to make some decisions on expansion and improving the facilities currently provided by CCD.

 

As a Regional Sales Manager, we would require creating a dashboard in Tableau with no less than 4 visuals showing the key performance indicators relevant to the requirement.

 

KPI’s: Rating (on a grade of 5), Approx. Cost (for two people), Online Order (Yes or No), Table Booking Facility (Yes or No), No. of branches of each restaurant.

Purpose/ Questions/Applications

Purpose

The purpose of this Dashboard is to present a graphical representation of data to the Executives of CCD. As the Dashboard is an Information Object, it should comply with the following Principles of Information Delivery

  1. Permission-based
  2. Personalized
  3. Proactive Alerts Notification
  4. Medium of Choice
  5. Interactive

The 5 W’s for this Dashboard is as follows:

WHO?

This report is designed for the VP of Sales and Senior Executive of Café Coffee Day.

 

WHAT?

This is a descriptive analysis finding based on Zomato’s Restaurant Data.

 

WHEN?

The tableau dashboard can be updated every quarter or on-demand based on business requirements.


WHERE?

The Zomato data was cleaned in Excel and Tableau and analyzed in Tableau.


WHY?

To identify any risk/ opportunities in the current performance of Café Coffee Day business in Bangalore by the top management of CCD.

Question

Let us now concentrate on the requirements mentioned in the Scenario and try to frame questions out of it.  The VP Sales of CCD wants a dashboard to be interactive, efficient, and effective, visualizing the KPI’s.

We can think about the below-mentioned question we can aim to answer from the Dashboard.

  • About Competitors:
  1. Who are the competitors of CCD?
  2. How many restaurants do they own?
  3. Is there any restaurant chain that has more branches than CCD?
  • Rating Distribution:
  1. What are the user ratings across the various location of CCD?
  2. What are the ratings of the competitors?
  3. Is there any chain of restaurants with a better rating than CCD?
  • Facilities Offered:
  1. Is there any facility for ordering online from CCD?
  2. If the answer is yes, then how many restaurants support online ordering?
  3. Do the competitors have this facility?
  4. Is there is a facility for table Booking in CCD?
  5. Do the competitors have this facility?
  • Cost:
    1. What is the average cost (for two people) to dine in CCD?
    2. What is the average cost for the competitors?

Application

Based on the answers to the questions mentioned above, the top management of CCD can take some crucial Operational Business Decisions. Operational decisions are not just decisions about administrative tasks. They include choosing the right suppliers and distribution channels for products. Operational decisions also include decisions on how to market CCD more and to bring it closer to the target customer. Operational decisions such as these play a significant role in determining a business's sales revenues and operational costs, which need to be sustainable.

 

Procedure

Let us know start with creating the visualizations for this Dashboard:

Connect Tableau with the Dataset

As the first step, let’s connect our Tableau Desktop to the Dataset that I downloaded from Kaggle. As mentioned earlier I have cleaned the data and saved it to excel in my personal computer.

To do the connection, Open Tableau Desktop:

Under Connect à Click on Microsoft Excel (To a File)

Select the Excel sheet that we want to connect.

When the data set is connected to Tableau the Data Source tab will look something like this:

Creating Worksheet

 

To create a worksheet, Go to the Sheet1 Tab just beside the Data source tab on the bottom of the page.

The new worksheet opens. We can see that the left pane is of Dimensions and Measures. Tableau divides the data into two main types: dimensions and measures. Dimensions are usually those fields that cannot be aggregated; measures, as its name suggests, are those fields that can be measured, aggregated, or used for mathematical operations.

As we open the worksheet, let us now concentrate on our Questions that need to be answered:

  • About Competitors:
  1. Who are the competitors of CCD?
  2. How many restaurants do they own?
  3. Is there any restaurant chain that has more branches than CCD?

Let us try to answer the above-mentioned questions first. To know who the competitors of CCD are we need to figure out the chain Restaurants first. So, here the two variables that can give us the answer is “Name” and “No. of Restaurants” (created during Data Prep).

Drag “Name” from the Dimensions and place it in the Columns Tab and “No. of Restaurants” to the rows tab. This sheet has all the restaurants and a total no of branches of that restaurant. Cool isn’t it?

But the sheet contains way too much information. We can further filter the worksheet to show the Top 10 restaurants in Bangalore. We can do that by dragging “Name” from Dimensions and placing it in the Filters section on the left.

The filter window pops up. Go to Top à By field

Select Top, 10, No. of Restaurants, Custom. Click Apply.

P.S I have selected the top 25 for more detailed information.

This looks good. But still, it is a little boring to see all the Blue Bars in front of us. Let’s play with some colors. Drag “Names” from Dimensions again and drop it on the “COLOR” block under the Section “Marks”. Rename the Worksheet as “Chain_Restaurants”.

That is so colorful and attractive, isn’t it? I have used a different color scheme. You can select your own.

Now, it is ready to be used in the Dashboard.

Similarly, let us try to answer other questions as well.

  • Rating Distribution:
  1. What are the user ratings across the various location of CCD?
  2. What are the ratings of the competitors?
  3. Is there any chain of restaurants with a better rating than CCD?

To create a new worksheet, click on the icon as shown below:

For rating distribution, our variables of interest are “Rate”, “Name”, “No. of Restaurants”.

Drag “Name” and “Rate” variable from the Dimensions and drop into the Columns section and drag “No. of Restaurants” from Measures to the Rows. Drag “Rate” to the Filter section as well as Color block. Rename the Worksheet as “Rating_Distribution”.

Exclude “Null” from Rate in the Filter section as depicted in the snapshot below:

The worksheet then will look something like this:

  • Facilities Offered:
  1. Is there any facility for ordering online from CCD?
  2. If the answer is yes, then how many restaurants support online ordering?
  3. Do the competitors have this facility?
  4. Is there is the facility of table Booking in CCD?
  5. Do the competitors have this facility?

To answer these questions, we need 2 Worksheets. The first worksheet will contain the details of online ordering and the second one will contain the details of the Table booking facility offered by the Restaurants.

Let us first create a sheet for online ordering.

Here our variable of concern is “Online Order”, “No. of Restaurants”.

Drag “Online Order” from dimension to Column. Filter the values and select only “Yes” or “No” for Online Order.

Drag “No. of Restaurants” to the Rows. Let us try some different forms of graphical representation other than Bar graph this time. Select Pie from the dropdown below “Marks”. Drag “No. of Restaurants” to the Angle block. Drag “Online order” to the Color and Label block. Rename the Worksheet as “Online_order”.

 

The worksheet will look something like the below pic:

Now let’s create a sheet for a table booking.

Here our variable of concern is “Book Table”, “No. of Restaurants”.

Drag “Book Table” from dimension to Columns. Filter the values and select only “Yes” or “No” for Book Table.

Drag “No. of Restaurants” to the Rows. Rename the Worksheet as “Table_Booking”.

The worksheet will look something like the below pic:

  • Cost:
    1. What is the average cost (for two people) to dine in CCD?
    2. What is the average cost for the competitors?

Drag “Name” from the Dimensions and place it in the Columns Tab and “Approx. Cost (For two people)” “No. of Restaurants” to the rows tab.

Click on the down arrow beside “Approx. Cost” variable in the column.

Select Measure àAverage

Filter the worksheet to show Top 25 restaurants in Bangalore. We can do that by dragging “Name” from Dimensions and placing it in the Filters section on the left (Detail description is provided earlier).

Drag “Name” to the Color block. Rename the Worksheet as “Approx Price for 2”.

The worksheet would look something like the below snapshot:

Creating a Dashboard

As we have created all the worksheets related to the Dashboard, let us now create a Dashboard. Creating a dashboard is easy if we have all our worksheets ready with answers to all the business questions that were asked. To create a Dashboard, go to the Dashboard Tab on top of the Page and click on New Dashboard. We can also create a dashboard by clicking the below-mentioned icon located at the bottom of the page.

After clicking the New Dashboard icon, a blank dashboard opens.

Here’s a quick overview of all the different dashboard options in the left navigation:

Dashboard and Layout tabs

By default, we will be working on the dashboard tab which allows us to set most aspects of the dashboard. The layout tab allows us to set the dimensions and location of individual dashboard components. All sizes on the Layout tab are in pixels.

Device Preview Button

The Device Preview button allows us to see what the dashboard will look like on different devices and we can even save different versions of the dashboard so that it looks different depending on what device it is displayed on.

Size

This is where we can set the height and width of the dashboard in pixels. There are several preset size options, or we can set the exact size of our choosing. If we choose the Automatic option, the dashboard will change to fill all available space on the screen it is being displayed on and resize the individual components of the dashboard accordingly.

Sheets

These are the individual worksheets in our workbook that can be added to the dashboard. It helps to give the worksheets good names so we can easily find them, but we can also get a thumbnail preview of the worksheet by hovering over the name in the left navigation.

Objects

Horizontal: Adds a horizontal layout container that additional objects can be added to.
Vertical: Adds a vertical layout container that additional objects can be added to.
Text: Opens a mini word processor where we can add and format any text we wish.
Image: Adds an image from our computer to the dashboard.
Web Page: Embeds a web page in the dashboard (requires an Internet connection to display the web page).
Blank: Adds blank space to the dashboard which can be helpful when dashboard elements are too close to each other and in a tiled layout.

Tiled or Floating

When dashboard elements are tiled, they fill all available space in their respective tiles. When dashboard elements are floating, we control their exact size and location on the dashboard. Each of these layouts comes with their pros and cons and the choice is largely dependent on our specific use case. Most Tableau users prefer the automatic resizing that comes with a tiled layout.

Tiled is the default layout option, so I am ready to go ahead and add individual sheets to my view.

To add a worksheet to a dashboard, Drag the worksheet name from the left navigation to the dashboard. Note that when we added a worksheet that has Chain Restaurants, the Chain restaurants were added automatically. The color Name can be used as a highlighter by simply clicking a color in the legend.

 

 

 

Drag and drop other sheets i.e. “Table Booking”, “Approx. Price for 2”, “Online Order” and “Rating Distribution”. Play with the alignment of the dashboard to make it according to our preference.

Select the Size as “Automatic”. The worksheets will be easier to accommodate. Give a Title to the Dashboard. I made it “Zomato Data Analysis”.

The dashboard will look something like this:

This dashboard is just a template, the display will depend on our selected alignment.

Now, once we have made the dashboard, let’s make it interactive. How can we do that?

Click on the “Chain Restaurant” worksheet on the dashboard. There is a Filter icon on the top right side. Refer to the pic below:

Click on the Filter icon. Now, this worksheet will act as the primary worksheet. The values of the other worksheet will depend on the values selected in the “Chain Restaurant” worksheet. E.g., if we select Onesta in the Chain Restaurants, the other worksheets will display values relevant to Onesta only. Refer to the pic below:

That was so cool. Right?

 

You can also add a caption to your worksheets by selecting Worksheets à Show Caption.

The final dashboard will look something like this:

Now that we have learned how a dashboard is created from scratch, don’t forget to save the Tableau Workbook on our computer.

Findings For dashboard:

Our dashboard tutorial aims at answering some crucial operational business questions. We figured out some key concerns. Our findings show that CCD is still the largest Café chain in Bangalore, but their ratings are not great. They also don’t have table bookings in any of their café s. They have an Online ordering facility but not in all their branches. We also found that the average cost of two people dining at CCD is high at 884INR. We can also see that Onesta is gaining popularity with better facilities and customer ratings. Their average cost is also low. CCD should urgently investigate the issues mentioned above and address them so that Onesta cannot take over CCD’s business in Bangalore.

 

Deliverable 2 – Storyboard

Before starting with the tutorial on Storyboard, I would like to discuss “what is a storyboard” and “How is it different than a dashboard”.

 

What is a Storyboard?

A story is a sequence of visualizations that work together to convey information. We can create stories to tell a data narrative, provide context, demonstrate how decisions relate to outcomes, or to simply make a compelling case.

Our Story will look something like this.

 

Link to our Storyboard:

https://public.tableau.com/profile/sharmistha.ganguly.ghosh#!/vizhome/Ghosh_SharmisthaGanguly_5_StoryboardTutorial/StoryboardTutorial?publish=yes

 

How is it different than a Dashboard?

The worksheet is the place where we will create visualizations with our data which can then be shown using a dashboard. Using tableau, we can tell a story with data, just as we can tell a story with text or with the film. Story Points gives anyone the tools to create a narrative with data without any programming knowledge.

Scenario:

Khanna Khazana Café is a North Indian café chain. It is a subsidiary of Royal Indian Food Limited. It is headquartered in Delhi, India. It rapidly expanded to other cities in India, with more than 100 cafés open across the nation. Khanna Khazana is trying to open its’ first restaurant in Bangalore. It is keen on opening its branch in a prime location in Bangalore. VP of Marketing team requested we (Regional Sales Manager) to provide him with a Storyboard showing the best place to open a restaurant along with the most popular dish that the chain can start with. With this report, he expects to analyze the current business scenario of North Indian restaurants in Bangalore. He expects to have an insight into the Pricing strategy, Cuisine Structure, and the restaurant types. He would like to have a quick look into the storyboard so the storyboard should not contain any complicated calculation or visual. He would also like to make some decisions on the expansion of their chain of restaurants further down the line.

 

As a Regional Sales Manager, we would require creating a storyboard in Tableau with no less than 6 visuals showing the key performance indicators relevant to the requirement.

KPI’s: Location, Cuisine, Dishes Liked, Restaurant Type Approx. Cost (for two people).

Purpose/ Questions/Applications

Purpose

The purpose of this storyboard is to present a graphical representation of data to the Executives of Khana Khazana Café. As the Storyboard is an Information Object, it should comply with the following Principles of Information Delivery

  • Permission-based
  • Personalized
  • Proactive Alerts Notification
  • Medium of Choice
  • Interactive

The 5 W’s for this Storyboard is as follows:

WHO?

This report is designed for the VP of Marketing and Senior Executive of Khana Khazana Café.

 

WHAT?

This is a diagnostic analysis finding based on Zomato’s Restaurant Data.

 

WHEN?

The tableau storyboard can be updated on-demand based on business requirements.


WHERE?

The Zomato data was cleaned in Excel and Tableau and analyzed in Tableau.


WHY?

To identify any risk/ opportunities in opening the inaugural Café business in Bangalore by the top management of Khana Khazana Café.

 

Questions

Let us now concentrate on the requirements mentioned in the Scenario and try to frame questions out of it.  The VP Marketing of Khana Khazana Café wants a storyboard to be interactive, efficient, and effective, visualizing the KPI’s.

We can think about the below-mentioned question we can aim to answer from the Storyboard.

  • About Cuisines:
  • What are the most popular cuisines in Bangalore?
  • How many average votes have each cuisine got?
  • What is the most popular cuisine?
  • About Dishes Liked:
  • What are dishes liked for the most popular cuisine?

 

  • About Location:
  • What are the top 15 cities in Bangalore that have the greatest number of North Indian Restaurants?
  • What is the No of restaurants in those cities of the most popular cuisine?
  • Which city has the greatest number of North Indian restaurants and which city has the least?
  • Pricing Distribution:
  • What is the average cost (for two people) to dine in these 15 cities?

 

Application

Based on the answers to the questions mentioned above, the top management of Khana Khazana Café can take some crucial Strategic decisions and Operational decisions. Strategic decisions are long-term decisions that will place the business in a profitable position. Operational decisions are not just decisions about administrative tasks. They include choosing the right suppliers and distribution channels for products. Operational decisions also include decisions on how to market Khana Khazana more and to bring it closer to the target customer. Operational decisions such as these play a significant role in determining a business's sales revenues and operational costs, which need to be sustainable.

 

Procedure

Instead of having to guess which key insights the team is interested in, and including them in a PowerPoint presentation, we decide to create a story in Tableau. This way, we can walk viewers through our data discovery process, and we have the option to interactively explore our data to answer any questions that come up during our presentation.

Create Worksheets:

Just like we did in the Dashboard, we need to create worksheets first to start with. We will try to answer these questions with our worksheets:

  • About Cuisines:
  • What are the popular cuisines in Bangalore?
  • How many average votes have each cuisine got?
  • What is the most popular cuisine?

Let us try to answer the above-mentioned questions first. To know what the most popular cuisines are we need to figure out all the cuisines according to popularity. So, here the two variables that can give us the answer is “Cuisine” and “Votes”.

Drag “Cuisines” from the Dimensions and place it in the Columns Tab and “Votes” to the rows tab. This sheet has all the cuisines corresponding to the votes for it. Drop Cuisines to Color block.

By default, when we select a measure, SUM is selected. Here, we need the Average Votes so we can change it by clicking on the drop-down beside the variable in the rows. Select “measure àAverage. The worksheet will look something like this:

Well, this list is extensive. We need to select the top 25 cuisines. To do that we need to add a filter to cuisines. Drop Cuisines to Filters block. Go to Top and change the values accordingly.

Our final filtered sheet looks like this:

Our visualization says Continental, North Indian, Italian, South Indian, Finger food is the most popular cuisine. Rename the sheet “Popular_Cuisine”

  • About Dishes Liked:
  • What are dishes liked for the most popular cuisine?

Here, our one of the most popular cuisine is North Indian. As Khana Khazana Café is primarily North Indian Café let us find out what are most liked dishes in North Indian Cuisines.

Drag “Cuisines” and “Dish Liked” Variables from Dimensions to Rows and “No. of Restaurants” from Measures to Columns. We need to Filter “Cuisines” to meet our needs. Drag “Cuisine” to Filters block and Go to Wildcard this time. Type “North Indian” and select Exactly Matches. Click Apply à OK.

Filter Dish Liked Variable as well. Select Top 3 Dishes Liked (Selection of Top values procedure as mentioned earlier.)

Drag “Dish Liked” to Color block. The final sheet will look something like this:

 

We find that Paratha, Biriyani Chicken Biriyani are the most popular dishes in North Indian Cuisine.

  • About Location:
  • What are the top 15 cities in Bangalore that have the greatest number of North Indian Restaurants?
  • What is the No of restaurants in those cities of the most popular cuisine?
  • Which city has the greatest number of North Indian restaurants and which city has the least?

Let us now investigate the top 15 cities in Bangalore for North Indian Cuisine. We will need variables “Cuisines”, “Listed in (City)” from Dimensions and “No. of Restaurants” from Measures. Drag “Cuisines”, “Listed in (City)” to Columns “No. of Restaurants” to Rows. We need to filter “Cuisines” “Listed in (City)” as done below:

Drag “No. of Restaurants” to Color and Label Block. The final worksheet will look something like this.

We can see from the visualizations that the top 15 cities in Bangalore that have the greatest number of North Indian Restaurants and their Restaurant counts. BTM has the greatest number of Restaurants and Lavelle Road has the least. Rename the sheet as “CityWise NorthIndianFood”.

  • More Investigation about Location:

To investigate further on Location let us create another worksheet:

Let us check the cuisines served by Lavelle Road restaurants. Our key variables here will be “Cuisines”, “Location” and “Dish Liked” from dimensions “No. of Restaurants from Measures.

Drag “Cuisines” “Location” to Columns and “Location” and “No. of Restaurants” to rows.

Filter Location to select only Lavelle Road. Filter Cuisine to select “North Indian”. There is no Restaurant in Lavelle Road that serves only North Indian. Hence, we selected the restaurants that serve North Indian Food with other cuisines.  Drag Dish Liked to Color block.

The Final sheet will look something like this:

Rename the sheet as “LavelleRoadSpecificCuisine”.

  • Restaurant Type Distribution based on Location:

To investigate further on Location by restaurant type let us create another worksheet:

Let us check the types of Restaurants in Lavelle Road. Our key variables here will be “Cuisines”, “Rest Type” and “Listed in (City)” from dimensions “No. of Restaurants” from Measures.

  • Drag “Cuisines” Rest Type” and “Listed in (City)” to Columns and “No. of Restaurants” to rows.
  • Filter Listed In (City) to select only Lavelle Road and BTM. Filter Cuisine to select “North Indian”. There is no Restaurant in Lavelle Road that serves only North Indian. Hence, we selected the restaurants that serve North Indian Food with other cuisines. Listed in (City) to Color block. Select Circle from the Marks dropdown.
  • The Final sheet will look something like this:

Rename the sheet as “Rest_type distribution”

  • Pricing Distribution:
  • What is the average cost (for two people) to dine in these 15 cities?

Let us now see the Price distribution of the restaurants for these cities. The variables of interest here are “Approx. Cost (for two people)”, “Cuisines” “Listed In (City)”.

Drag “Cuisines” “Listed In (City)” in Column and “Approx. Cost (for two people)” in Rows. Change the variable value from Sum to Average.

Filter “Cuisines” “Listed In (City)” accordingly. (See previous steps).

Drag “Listed In (City)” to Color and drag “Approx. Cost (for two people)” to Label. The Final Worksheet will look something like this.

We can conclude that Lavelle Road is the costliest place and BTM has a moderate pricing range. Rename the sheet as “Price_for_Two”.

Create a story point

For the presentation, we'll start with an overview.

  • Click the New story

We are presented with a blank workspace that reads, "Drag a sheet here." This is where we will create our first story point.

If we are thinking that blank stories look a lot like blank dashboards, that's because they do. And like a dashboard, we can drag worksheets over to present them. We can also drag dashboards over to present them in our story.

  • From the Story pane on the left, drag the Popular_Cuisine worksheet onto our view.
  • Add a caption—maybe "Top 25 most popular Cuisines of Bangalore Restaurants by votes"—by editing the text in the gray box above the worksheet. This story point will be a useful way to acquaint viewers with our data.
  • Highlight the most popular cuisine: To bring the most popular cuisine into the picture, we can leverage the Cuisines filter included in our Popular_Cuisine bar chart.
  • In the Story pane, click Duplicate to duplicate the first caption. Since we are telling a story about the most popular Cuisine, highlight the most popular Cuisine and the rest will fade out.
  • In the Story pane, select Blank.
  • From the Story pane on the left, drag the Dishes Liked worksheet onto our view.
  • In the left-hand pane, select Drag to add text and drag it onto our view. Add a description to make our point.

Here, we wanted to highlight the most popular dishes in North Indian Cuisine. The story point looks something like this:

  • In the Story pane, select Blank.
  • From the Story pane on the left, drag the “CityWise NorthIndianFood” worksheet onto our view. This sheet shows the top 15 cities with the largest number of North Indian Restaurants.
  • In the Story pane, click Duplicate to duplicate the first caption. Since we are telling a story about the most popular cities, highlight the most popular city and the least popular among the 15 selected cities and the rest will fade out.
  • Drag the Drag to add text and make our point to explain the relevance of the worksheet to our story. BTM has the highest number of restaurants while Lavelle Road has the lowest among the 15 top cities.
  • In the Story pane, select Blank.
  • From the Story pane on the left, drag the “Price_for_Two” worksheet onto our view.
  • In the left-hand pane, select Drag to add text and drag it onto our view. Add a description to make our point. High light the two cities to show the difference in cost among the two cities.
  • In the Story pane, select Blank.
  • From the Story pane on the left, drag the “LavelleRoadSpecificCuisine” worksheet onto our view.
  • In the left-hand pane, select Drag to add text and drag it onto our view. Add a description to make our point.  Here, our finding is there is no such restaurant in Lavelle Road that serves Paratha, Biriyani, or Chicken Biriyani, the most popular North Indian Dishes.
  • In the Story pane, select Blank.
  • From the Story pane on the left, drag the “Rest_type distribution” worksheet onto our view.
  • In the left-hand pane, select Drag to add text and drag it onto our view. Add a description to make our point. Here, our finding is that there are many "Quick Bites" restaurants (most popular restaurant type) BTM but they are less in Lavelle Road.

 

  • Rename the Storyboard as StoryBoard Tutorial.

Now that we have learned how a storyboard is created from scratch, don’t forget to save the Tableau Workbook on our computer.

 

 

Findings for Storyboard:

Our storyboard tutorial aims at answering some crucial strategic and operational business questions. Our findings show that North Indian Cuisine is one of the most popular cuisines in Bangalore. As Khana Khazana Café is North Indian based Café chain it can start its business in Bangalore. Paratha, Biriyani, and Chicken Biriyani is the most popular cuisine and hence it can start with these items. We investigate further to select the location for starting the business. Lavelle Road is a popular destination and people dining here pay a lot to dine in. But this location has no restaurant that is dedicated to North Indian Cuisine. We also find that no restaurant is serving Paratha, Biriyani, or Chicken Biriyani here. The no of Quick Bites restaurant is also less in this location. Hence, KKC can open its branch here and start with a Quick Bites and Delivery type restaurant that will serve different types of Parathas and Biriyani.

 

Conclusions:

Saving to Tableau public:

With Tableau Public all the views and data are made public and anybody on the internet has access to it.

Select Server à Tableau Public àSave to Tableau Public

That’s all we need to create a good visualization in tableau. Although we might find doing a lot more revising in each stage than we did here.  So, with experimentation and practice, tableau becomes a lot more familiar and will unleash amazing features to help us to analyze and present data.

Happy Visualizing!!

Learning Objective Table:

 

Learning Objectives Activities/Tasks

Activities/Tasks

How Would You Measure the Student's Learning

To become familiar with TABLEAU (visualization tool) for data analytics.

 

By creating various worksheets and playing with the data we became familiar with the different attributes of Tableau. We know Dimensions Measures and how to use them and where to use them.

By following the tasks list, the student will have produced the exact chart and thus gain insight on Tableau.

To learn multiple ways of representing data.

 

By creating different types of charts and using a variety of calculations and colors and label and use of text in an appropriate place.

By following the exact ways of creating graphs, the student should have learned the various ways of representing the data.

To learn to draw inferences, hypotheses, and form questions based on visualizations.

 

By analyzing the sheets and drawing conclusions from the graphics.

We learned to answer questions with data visualizations and give some suggestions to the operational challenges faced by the business.

By following the procedures mentioned above in the tutorial the student should have learned to draw inferences from Data.

To become familiar at using the TABLEAU Dashboard and Storyboard to represent the analyses graphically.

 

By creating a Tableau Dashboard with 5 visualizations and aligning it with the questions that needed to be answered. Filtering the dashboard and color-coding it for easy understanding.

By creating a Tableau Storyboard with 8 visualizations and creating a story point with Data.

Highlighting the key point and making appropriate comments when and where required.

By following the procedures, the student should be able to create an attractive and interesting interactive Dashboard and storyboard.

 

Limitations:

Sometimes the tools we use to gather big data sets are imprecise. There can be missing data or incomplete data that can hinder the process of analyzing the data sets. Moreover, we have used data to tease out correlation: when one variable is linked to another. However, not all these correlations are substantial or meaningful. Just because 2 variables are correlated or linked doesn’t mean that a causative relationship exists between them (i.e., “correlation does not imply causation”).

 

References:

(https://www.wikipedia.org, n.d.)

               https://www.kaggle.com/

https://www.evolytics.com/blog/tableau-fundamentals-introduction-dashboards-distribution/

https://www.analyticsvidhya.com/learning-paths-data-science-business-analytics-business-intelligence-big-data/tableau-learning-path/

 

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